Sol Slam Mountain Jam 2019

Sol Driven Train and USA Raft are excited to present Sol Slam Mountain Jam 2019, a family-friendly camp out music festival on the banks of the Nolichucky River in Erwin, TN, over Labor Day Weekend, August 30 - September 1, 2019.  Our mission is to be the best “end of summer” music festival in the region while celebrating music and life in an intimate, naturally stunning environment. Ticket quantities will be limited to promote the highest quality event experience.

USA Raft is a whitewater outfitter boasting a beautiful tent campground along with cabins nestled in the woods.  Daily activities will be offered including hikes, stand up paddle boarding, tubing and caving. Vendors will be on hand selling delicious food and libations.  

A portion of the proceeds will go towards benefiting the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy and Ziggy's Second Chance Network. SAHC works to conserve the unique plant and animal habitat, clean water, farmland, scenic beauty, and places for people to enjoy outdoor recreation in the mountains of North Carolina and Tennessee for the benefit of present and future generations. We achieve this by forging and maintaining long-term conservation relationships with private landowners and public agencies, owning and managing land and encouraging healthy local communities. ZSCN is a small group of volunteers dedicated to providing care to special needs and senior animals... and spaying all the cats! 

 

The Music

SOL DRIVEN TRAIN ~ FacebookWebsite | Music 

Sol Driven Train’s music weaves through genres like images in a Tom Robbins paragraph. The band’s playful sonic schizophrenia absorbs songwriting influences like John Prine and Paul Simon, Afro-caribbean rhythmic explorations, and funky New Orleans-style brass into earnest songs of life, love, loss, and long johns. The versatile 5-piece band, based in Charleston, SC, features rotating lead vocalists, and multi-instrumental talent spread across horns, strings, keyboards, and percussion. Combining rich varieties of American pop and folk music into their own brass-kickin' roots rock sound, Sol Driven Train has carved out a unique musical identity within the Jam and Americana music scene.

Sol Driven Train's sound has helped shape their hometown’s musical identity for more than a decade. It’s soulful and rich like Charleston’s food, approachable like its people, rooted in history like its architecture, and as diverse as you’d expect from a city that, for instance, has a Prius-driving Democrat for a mayor in one of the country’s reddest states. During the spring of 2000, a close circle of friends began gathering in college apartments downtown Charleston to create sound and share in the fun and cathartic joy of music. Through the course of nearly 18 years and over 1,500 live shows, this same spirit still guides Sol Driven Train through the rocky road of the music industry. The venues have grown from bedrooms to festival stages, the amps have gotten louder, the lineup has evolved, and the crowds have multiplied, but the sense of brotherhood, mutual support, and creative independence within the band has strengthened. Along the way, the band has performed alongside their musical heroes, sharing stages with greats such as Bruce Hornsby, Levon Helm, Michael Franti, and Blues Traveler.

The band believes strongly in giving back to their community, and takes time each year to perform for children and donate their services to help local health, education, and environmental charity organizations. Through hard work and a commitment to live performance, the band’s reputation and collective musical ability has grown with every season.

Named “2011 Rock Band of the Year” "2012 Jam Band of the Year" and "2013 World/Groove/Reggae Band of the Year" by the Charleston City Paper, and “On the Verge” by Relix Magazine in January 2012, Sol Driven Train is an independent band breaking into the national spotlight. Thirteen independent releases including two critically-acclaimed albums for children, a live concert DVD, a live album, eight full-length studio albums, and 2013's popular “Watermelon” EP document the band’s winding musical development.

2016 saw the release of Sol Driven Train's "Sunday", the band's first album to feature bassist Matty Thompson and pianist Ross Bogan. Drawing influence from years of experience on the road and their surrogate home in the US Virgin Islands, "Sunday" is Sol Driven Train's most comprehensive album to date.

2018 will mark the band's 9th US Virgin Islands Tour in addition to the completion of their ninth full-length album. The band continues to tour the United States while making more time to spend with family and good friends.

YARN ~ FacebookWebsiteMusic

Even the most dire circumstance can offer opportunity for new beginnings. Just ask singer/songwriter Blake Christiana or any of the other members of the once Brooklyn based Americana band called Yarn. At least that’s the conclusion they came to after a period of real life challenges that left the band splintered and unsure of their forward trajectory. Internal tensions were simmering. A new album was scrapped. A major move from Brooklyn to North Carolina added to the uncertainty. For a band that seemed forever on the verge of a big breakthrough, the future suddenly seemed cloudy.  “We were dealing with real life issues,” Christiana explains. “Broken relationships, a sense of having to regroup and put some things -- and people -- behind us. That’s what I was writing about lyrically in the new songs and it became kind of a catharsis. Nothing was contrived. We didn’t have to relate to it in the third person. We were living these circumstances, and that gave us the impetus and inspiration to share our sentiments. Ultimately those setbacks and difficulties led to new opportunities and allowed a little light to shine through.”  Christiana’s referring to the band’s album, the boldly optimistic  This Is the Year . A seamless blend of vibrant, inspired, back porch melodies and narrative, descriptive lyrics that detail the challenges faced when one’s life is jolted off its bearings, the record documents in detail the band’s determination to move forward while balancing precariously on a line that forms a border between love and hate. It’s an album about re-evaluating relationships, making tough choices and sometimes skirting the rules, a tack that was inspired by musicians they admire -- Waylon and Willie, Merle Haggard and other Texas troubadours with a distinctly renegade reputation.  For Christiana, bassist Rick Bugel, singer guitarist Rod Hohl and drummer Bobby Bonhomme, it meant taking a fresh look at where they were versus what they wanted to accomplish. Bonhomme had recently returned to the fold after an extended absence, while another longtime member was purged. “The tension suddenly dissolved,” Christiana says, giving an audible sigh of relief. “Suddenly we were free to express ourselves without having to look back over our shoulders. This album is our emancipation.”  “I think this album is a stepping stone for us, one we desperately needed,” Bonhomme adds. “It marks a much needed change in direction. The title is appropriate. This  is  the year, because now we can look forward. This  is  who we are. For the first time in a very long time we’re not afraid of taking chances. The bond between each of the band members has never been better, and it’s that camaraderie that helped us move forward and created the kind of passion that is evident in this album.”  “This is our best album yet,” Bugel adds. “This is also the happiest the band’s ever been. The chemistry we shared in the studio and on the stage is nothing short of amazing.”  That’s certainly no small accomplishment, especially for a band that spent two years honing their chops during a Monday night residency at the famed Kenny’s Castaway in New York’s Greenwich Village. In effect, it allowed them to rehearse onstage, mostly in front of audiences that often ranged in size from five to fifty people on any given night. Five studio albums followed --  Yarn (2007),  Empty Pockets  (2008),  Come On In  (2010),  Almost Home  (2012) and  Shine the Light On  (2013). The band then took to the road, playing upwards of 170 shows a year and sharing stages with such superstars as Dwight Yoakam, Charlie Daniels, Marty Stuart, Allison Krauss, Leon Russell, Jim Lauderdale and The Lumineers. They performed at any number of prestigious venues -- Mountain Stage, Daytrotter, the Orange Peel in Asheville, the Fox Theater in Boulder, the 9:30 Club in D.C, South by Southwest, the Strawberry Festival, Rhythm and Roots, Meadowgrass and more, eventually accumulating a total of 1,000 shows, half a million miles and performances in 32 states. They’ve driven nonstop, made countless radio station appearances, driven broken-down RVs and watched as their van caught fire. They’ve paid their dues and then some, looking forward even as they were forced to glance behind.  Indeed, the accolades piled up quickly along the way. They received a Grammy nomination, garnered nods from the Americana Music Association, placed top five on both Radio and Records and the AMA album charts, garnered airplay on Sirius FM, I Tunes, Pandora, CNN, CMT and Roughstock.com, and also accorded the “Download of the Day” from  Rolling Stone .  Shine the Light On  found shared song writing credits with John Oates (the Oates of Hall & Oates fame), and when audiences expressed their admiration, it brought the band a populist following of diehard devotees, popularly known as “the Yarmy.”  As odd as that might seem, it’s proof positive that Yarn have made their mark, and in their dealing with emotions, scars and circumstances, they find themselves in a position to share those experiences with others who have sifted through similar sentiments.  In an era of click-bait and sound bites, Yarn provides a real experience. They're not just a live band, they're a band for people who want to live.

Even the most dire circumstance can offer opportunity for new beginnings. Just ask singer/songwriter Blake Christiana or any of the other members of the once Brooklyn based Americana band called Yarn. At least that’s the conclusion they came to after a period of real life challenges that left the band splintered and unsure of their forward trajectory. Internal tensions were simmering. A new album was scrapped. A major move from Brooklyn to North Carolina added to the uncertainty. For a band that seemed forever on the verge of a big breakthrough, the future suddenly seemed cloudy.

“We were dealing with real life issues,” Christiana explains. “Broken relationships, a sense of having to regroup and put some things -- and people -- behind us. That’s what I was writing about lyrically in the new songs and it became kind of a catharsis. Nothing was contrived. We didn’t have to relate to it in the third person. We were living these circumstances, and that gave us the impetus and inspiration to share our sentiments. Ultimately those setbacks and difficulties led to new opportunities and allowed a little light to shine through.”

Christiana’s referring to the band’s album, the boldly optimistic This Is the Year. A seamless blend of vibrant, inspired, back porch melodies and narrative, descriptive lyrics that detail the challenges faced when one’s life is jolted off its bearings, the record documents in detail the band’s determination to move forward while balancing precariously on a line that forms a border between love and hate. It’s an album about re-evaluating relationships, making tough choices and sometimes skirting the rules, a tack that was inspired by musicians they admire -- Waylon and Willie, Merle Haggard and other Texas troubadours with a distinctly renegade reputation.

For Christiana, bassist Rick Bugel, singer guitarist Rod Hohl and drummer Bobby Bonhomme, it meant taking a fresh look at where they were versus what they wanted to accomplish. Bonhomme had recently returned to the fold after an extended absence, while another longtime member was purged. “The tension suddenly dissolved,” Christiana says, giving an audible sigh of relief. “Suddenly we were free to express ourselves without having to look back over our shoulders. This album is our emancipation.”

“I think this album is a stepping stone for us, one we desperately needed,” Bonhomme adds. “It marks a much needed change in direction. The title is appropriate. This is the year, because now we can look forward. This is who we are. For the first time in a very long time we’re not afraid of taking chances. The bond between each of the band members has never been better, and it’s that camaraderie that helped us move forward and created the kind of passion that is evident in this album.”

“This is our best album yet,” Bugel adds. “This is also the happiest the band’s ever been. The chemistry we shared in the studio and on the stage is nothing short of amazing.”

That’s certainly no small accomplishment, especially for a band that spent two years honing their chops during a Monday night residency at the famed Kenny’s Castaway in New York’s Greenwich Village. In effect, it allowed them to rehearse onstage, mostly in front of audiences that often ranged in size from five to fifty people on any given night. Five studio albums followed -- Yarn(2007), Empty Pockets (2008), Come On In (2010), Almost Home (2012) and Shine the Light On (2013). The band then took to the road, playing upwards of 170 shows a year and sharing stages with such superstars as Dwight Yoakam, Charlie Daniels, Marty Stuart, Allison Krauss, Leon Russell, Jim Lauderdale and The Lumineers. They performed at any number of prestigious venues -- Mountain Stage, Daytrotter, the Orange Peel in Asheville, the Fox Theater in Boulder, the 9:30 Club in D.C, South by Southwest, the Strawberry Festival, Rhythm and Roots, Meadowgrass and more, eventually accumulating a total of 1,000 shows, half a million miles and performances in 32 states. They’ve driven nonstop, made countless radio station appearances, driven broken-down RVs and watched as their van caught fire. They’ve paid their dues and then some, looking forward even as they were forced to glance behind.

Indeed, the accolades piled up quickly along the way. They received a Grammy nomination, garnered nods from the Americana Music Association, placed top five on both Radio and Records and the AMA album charts, garnered airplay on Sirius FM, I Tunes, Pandora, CNN, CMT and Roughstock.com, and also accorded the “Download of the Day” from Rolling Stone. Shine the Light On found shared song writing credits with John Oates (the Oates of Hall & Oates fame), and when audiences expressed their admiration, it brought the band a populist following of diehard devotees, popularly known as “the Yarmy.”

As odd as that might seem, it’s proof positive that Yarn have made their mark, and in their dealing with emotions, scars and circumstances, they find themselves in a position to share those experiences with others who have sifted through similar sentiments.

In an era of click-bait and sound bites, Yarn provides a real experience. They're not just a live band, they're a band for people who want to live.

DANGERMUFFIN ~ Facebook | Website | Music

On Kindred Sun, the antepenultimate track off of Dangermuffin’s critically acclaimed 2017 album, Heritage, Dan Lotti sings: The path ahead unfolds. The map lays out in front of you. Push pins into the souls of the lands that inspire you. Part exhortation, part personal mantra, the words reflect the band’s own musical course, always heading somewhere but following their hearts and trusting the universe’s energies to guide them.

In 2007, those energies first aligned to connect Lotti and Mike Sivilli and form the genesis of the band now known as Dangermuffin. Lotti, already an award-winning songwriter, and Sivilli, a prodigious and fast-rising guitarist on the Charleston, South Carolina music scene, quickly spotted a unique musical synergy. To Lotti’s profound lyricism and moving vocal delivery, Sivilli added an equally expressive six-string “voice,” creating distinct sonic textures and phrasing that both punctuated and enriched Lotti’s lush and oftentimes reflective musical storylines. Indeed, the roots of the Dangermuffin sound had started to take form, and the two artists would collaborate that year (with Jim Donnelly on drums) to record the band’s inaugural and widely acclaimed album, Beermuda.

Less than a year later, in 2008, the universe would again intervene, introducing Steven Sandifer to the band. Sandifer, a highly sought-after drummer and percussionist on the Charleston music scene, had caught the ears and interest of Lotti and Sivilli, and the three began to play out locally, discovering a powerful musical symmetry and an equally strong personal connection. If 2007 planted the roots of a Dangermuffin sound, 2008 would see those roots firmly take hold, establishing the foundation for the band’s early studio recordings and exhilarating live performances.

Whether in the studio or on stage, Dangermuffin’s sound has always been conspicuously greater than the sum of its parts, and to witness the band live is to question everything you know about the dynamics of sound. While your eyes perceive a trio, your ears challenge that perception, registering a much broader, fuller, and complex soundstage. In part, this is due to Lotti’s clever technique of using the bass strings of his guitar to mimic the low end of an actual bass while concurrently playing rhythm, but it’s as much due to Sivilli’s fluent, poignant, often soaring riffs, and Sandifer’s creative, jazzy, and lively skins. Nowadays, the band alternates between trio and quartet, but this phenomenon was particularly evident in the early days, when the band played exclusively as a threesome.

Between 2008 and 2012 the band would split their time between the studio and the road, recording three more albums and aggressively touring the country in support of their music. Within that period, the trio would release both Moonscapes, the band’s most polished and carefully produced album to that date, and Olly Oxen Free, a breathtaking, multi-genre compilation and winner of the HGMN Album of the Year for 2012. Radio stations, music publications, and music junkies across the country were taking notice, and the band would begin playing major music festivals such as Wanee, AllGood, Wakarusa, and Gathering of the Vibes, and sharing bills with bands and artists such as Hot Tuna, Grace Potter, moe, Keller Williams, Leftover Salmon and many other prominent national acts.

Of course, as bands become more prominent so, too, does the tendency of the industry to try to classify and define them, and Dangermuffin is no exception. Tagged every style from jamband and southern rock to acoustic folk and bluegrass, the band has consistently shattered all categorizations and defied pigeonholing. While “Roots-Rock Americana” might be the most fitting and recurring label for the band, no designation perfectly characterizes Dangermuffin and its sound. As both Lotti and Sandifer assert: We’re the American Experience, which is a melange of styles, including roots, rock, bluegrass, reggae, island, and many other influences. We’re multi-genre.

While it may be futile to try to define Dangermuffin’s sound, it is possible to pinpoint the themes that inspire much of band’s music, and perhaps no theme is as prominent and consistent as nature, including the ocean, the sun, and the mountains…all ancient and powerful and capable of immeasurable and profound healing. These ideas, running like threads through almost every Dangermuffin album, together form the basis of some of the band’s most deeply held principles and teachings: respect the earth, stay open to the universe, and strive for healing. Not coincidentally, according to Lotti, if Dangermuffin’s music could accomplish just one thing, it would be to heal.

Since 2017 and the release of Heritage, the band has undergone perhaps its greatest evolution, both in format and sound. Most notably, it started touring with a new drummer (Adam Williams), freeing up Sandifer to play the upright bass, congas, and other percussive world instruments. Having the flexibility to play as either a trio or quartet has allowed the group to shift between intimate, acoustic experiences and rockin’ electric journeys, liberating setlists and empowering the band to play a greater variety of tunes live. For the band and fans alike, this has led to some of Dangermuffin’s most inspired, exciting, and surprising performances of its career, and has planted the seed of an epic live album release in 2019—the universe and its energies permitting!

LYRIC - Facebook | Website | Music

Singer-songwriter, Leeda Lyric Jones is a Western North Mountain Xpress “best of” awards ul, best singer-songwriter, all around favorite band and band that gives back to the community.

She was born and raised in Asheville, North Carolina. It is safe to say that music is in her blood; her grandfather played harmonica and guitar with the late blues legend B.B. King, and father, whom plays bass in her band has been playing in bands since his teenage years. Upon graduation of high school in 2006, Lyric enrolled at Western Carolina University where she played piano and sang in the choir. After going through the motions of college, she soon realized that it wasn’t the path she should be on, so she took to Youtube and taught herself how to play guitar. Which soon led to her to take the advice of her father, and start busking on the streets of Asheville. Lyric began busking with only two songs, an original titled “Stride”, and “Halo” by Beyonce. During this time she got a mix of reactions - some folks didn’t believe that those who were serious about their craft would take to the street corners, while others stood and awe and found themselves moved to tears by her lyrics. In 2009, she met Lizz Wright while busking, at the time, she had no idea that the two of them would share the same stage in 2011. Since taking to the streets, Lyric has shared the stage with legends such as Mavis Staples, George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic, Gladys Knight, Booker T. Jones, Little Big Town, Dionne Warwick, Cedric Burnside, Amy Ray (Indigo Girls), Fred Wesley & the Lee Boys, Count M’Butu and Warren Haynes and Aaron Mills of Cameo.

Lyric went on her first North East Tour with Lizz Wright in 2017, and she draws inspiration from India Arie, Tracy Chapman, and Lauryn Hill. Which isn’t surprising once one hears the way she gracefully intertwines Soul, R&B, Funk, and even a little Hip-Hop - the best portrayal of this intertwinement can be heard in “You Can Win”, which is on her “Perspective” EP.

THE RECKONING ~ FacebookWebsiteMusic

Based in beautiful Charleston South Carolina, The Reckoning offers a fresh new approach to the seemingly infinite library of songs and soundscapes that can only be defined as "Grateful Dead". Celebrating the band's entire catalogue of material as it developed and danced through the decades, The Reckoning leaves no leaf unturned, and the music never stops!

Based in beautiful Charleston South Carolina, The Reckoning offers a fresh new approach to the seemingly infinite library of songs and soundscapes that can only be defined as "Grateful Dead". Celebrating the band's entire catalogue of material as it developed and danced through the decades, The Reckoning leaves no leaf unturned, and the music never stops!

THE DANBERRYS ~ FacebookWebsiteMusic

'I can’t get up there and sing something that doesn’t move me,' says Dorothy Daniel, the tambourine-shaking, stargazing, breezy voiced front woman that makes up half of The Danberrys. Hailing from the surrounds of Nashville TN, Dorothy and husband Ben DeBerry (guitar/vocals) come together to create a unique entwining of styles. Acoustically driven, their sound spirals through bluegrass with the backbeat of funk, the patient lope of blues, and glimpses of pop.  Their latest album 'Give & Receive', was recorded at Zac Brown's Southern Ground studio in Nashville, TN and was released in June 2016. The album received two Independent Music Award nominations for Best Americana Album and Best Country Song (Let Me Ride), and one win for Best Bluegrass Song (Long Song).  The Danberrys sing songs rich in pastoral imagery, about overcoming demons, being washed clean and starting anew, and love in its many forms. In conversation with both Ben and Dorothy, spirituality, and the concept of blooming into the full power of your brain and heart are topics that often surface, naturally suffusing into their lyrics with clever subtlety - more hinting than hollering.  ‘Give and Receive’, 2012’s self titled ‘The Danberrys’, and 2011’s ‘The Company Store’ feature a similar cast of musicians. All three harness the unique skills of producer/multi instrumentalist Ethan Ballinger (Lee Ann Womack, Missy Raines) and fiddle player Christian Sedelmeyer (Jerry Douglas,10 String Symphony), with bassist Sam Grisman (Lee Ann Womack, David Grisman) and banjoist Kyle Tuttle (Jeff Austin Band, Hayseed Dixie) coming in on ‘Give and Receive’.  Live, Dorothy is a fiend for the tambourine: ‘I locked myself in our music room for hours’ she says, describing her honing of the much overlooked instrument. Learning to play, she would follow the band Blue Mother Tupelo from gig to gig, gleaning techniques from Indianola-born Micol Davis and recordings of Dr John, the Meters, and Alan Toussaint.  Having embraced bluegrass in 2008 at The 5 Spot (bar in East Nashville) weekly bluegrass jam, Ben’s acoustic guitar playing is a lynchpin in the Danberrys sound. His solid playing and grasp of theory leads to interesting harmonic shifts - letting their music straddle and dip into the crannies between genres.  The Danberrys have appeared at many festivals throughout the Southeast – including the CMA Festival, the International Bluegrass Music Association festival, the Americana Music Festival and many more. They are currently in the studio with producer/drummer Marco Giovino and producer Brian Brinkerhoff recording their fourth studio album.

'I can’t get up there and sing something that doesn’t move me,' says Dorothy Daniel, the tambourine-shaking, stargazing, breezy voiced front woman that makes up half of The Danberrys. Hailing from the surrounds of Nashville TN, Dorothy and husband Ben DeBerry (guitar/vocals) come together to create a unique entwining of styles. Acoustically driven, their sound spirals through bluegrass with the backbeat of funk, the patient lope of blues, and glimpses of pop.

Their latest album 'Give & Receive', was recorded at Zac Brown's Southern Ground studio in Nashville, TN and was released in June 2016. The album received two Independent Music Award nominations for Best Americana Album and Best Country Song (Let Me Ride), and one win for Best Bluegrass Song (Long Song).

The Danberrys sing songs rich in pastoral imagery, about overcoming demons, being washed clean and starting anew, and love in its many forms. In conversation with both Ben and Dorothy, spirituality, and the concept of blooming into the full power of your brain and heart are topics that often surface, naturally suffusing into their lyrics with clever subtlety - more hinting than hollering.

‘Give and Receive’, 2012’s self titled ‘The Danberrys’, and 2011’s ‘The Company Store’ feature a similar cast of musicians. All three harness the unique skills of producer/multi instrumentalist Ethan Ballinger (Lee Ann Womack, Missy Raines) and fiddle player Christian Sedelmeyer (Jerry Douglas,10 String Symphony), with bassist Sam Grisman (Lee Ann Womack, David Grisman) and banjoist Kyle Tuttle (Jeff Austin Band, Hayseed Dixie) coming in on ‘Give and Receive’.

Live, Dorothy is a fiend for the tambourine: ‘I locked myself in our music room for hours’ she says, describing her honing of the much overlooked instrument. Learning to play, she would follow the band Blue Mother Tupelo from gig to gig, gleaning techniques from Indianola-born Micol Davis and recordings of Dr John, the Meters, and Alan Toussaint.

Having embraced bluegrass in 2008 at The 5 Spot (bar in East Nashville) weekly bluegrass jam, Ben’s acoustic guitar playing is a lynchpin in the Danberrys sound. His solid playing and grasp of theory leads to interesting harmonic shifts - letting their music straddle and dip into the crannies between genres.

The Danberrys have appeared at many festivals throughout the Southeast – including the CMA Festival, the International Bluegrass Music Association festival, the Americana Music Festival and many more. They are currently in the studio with producer/drummer Marco Giovino and producer Brian Brinkerhoff recording their fourth studio album.

SALLY & GEORGE ~ FacebookWebsiteMusic

In the town where country music was born--where two states come together on one street--a spark lit and a duo was ignited. At the 2012 Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion, on the way to take the stage with his band, Sol Driven Train, guitarist/singer Joel Timmons found himself sidetracked by Della Mae, an all-female, GRAMMY-nominated bluegrass band. It was that group's bass player, Shelby Means, who most captivated his attention. After a conversation at the merchandise table about their shared love of travel and music, two-years passed before Means and Timmons would reconnect. A bold love song led the way, and eventually a growing romance turned into the Nashville-based duo Sally & George and their debut album   tip my heart .     With   tip my heart  , Sally & George have made an engaging, eclectic debut album. It’s a thoughtful meditation on Means’ and Timmons’ courtship and love (the duo got engaged in July 2016 on a mountain in North Carolina after work on   tip my heart   was completed). The album deftly moves from rollicking, electrified rockers to stripped down, gauzy reflections on love and faith, to walking bass-led country-indebted duets. All of it is done tastefully, with an earnestness that does not shy away from humor or the occasional cuss word.      tip my heart   came together over the course of two-years, in three chapters. The first chapter began in Laramie, Wyoming at Thanksgiving 2014. Timmons and Means were visiting Means’ parents for the holiday. They had four original songs and since the snow was coming down sideways, they enlisted the engineering of a mutual friend and decided to go into the studio. Their intention was to have some fun and experiment recording together. After a day and a half in Thunderground Sound Studio, the duo had five rough mixes and newfound confidence that they could make a great record together. When they were driving to Denver to catch their flight home, they were so excited listening to their roughs that they missed a turn and ended up in Nebraska.    Chapter two was over a year later in Charleston, SC, at the home studio of Shovels & Rope on Wadmalaw Island. After a busy year, Means and Timmons had gathered enough songs to go back into the studio. Shovels & Rope’s Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent were old friends of Timmons’ in the Charleston music scene. Since Hearst and Trent were taking some time off the road with their new baby, they invited Sally & George to spend a few days recording at Studio Bees. The family atmosphere and the rock and roll edge of Shovels & Rope both found their way into the music that was recorded there.    Chapter three happened six months later. Sally & George finished things off at Tim Carter’s studio just outside of Music City. The casual atmosphere at Tim’s cabin studio made Sally & George feel at home and they were able to dig into the final production of   tip my heart,   they brought in Nashville friends like 10 String Symphony, Langhorne Slim, The Danberrys and more for overdubs and finished the record.    The title track, "Tip My Heart," is a great example of what makes Sally & George such a potent musical duo. Written by Means when she was still in Della Mae, the song didn't fit into that band's framework. The playful lyrics (with references to Jack and Jill and Humpty Dumpty) are enhanced by Shelby and Joel's glittering harmonies and a fiery electric guitar.    After their initial meeting at Bristol Rhythm and Roots, Timmons was inspired to write “Pipedream,” vividly imagining what it would be like to spend the rest of their lives together. He emailed Means the song and waited an excruciating two weeks for her reply. She finally wrote back, thanking him for the flattery and commenting that it took big balls to send something like that. She also informed him that she already had a boyfriend. When that boyfriend exited the picture a few months later, their romance began.    “Wild Tiger Style” and “Love Electric” both reflect the duos rock and roll side, with electric guitars and seductive, impassioned vocals. A gauzy, questioning track, “Baby” was inspired by a quote Means heard in yoga class and her time spent rocking a newborn baby to sleep at a plant nursery job. The track came together at Shovels & Rope’s studio, with Trent and Hearst’s baby blessing the space before tapes were rolling.    A longtime surfer in Charleston, Timmons’ love for Means meant uprooting himself and moving to Nashville. “Nashville Beach” is Timmons’ attempt to assuage his ocean heart by imagining life in Nashville as a different kind of wave. “Hey Wow” was Sally & George’s first appointment co-write. The duo scheduled a time and met in their living room, channeling the sometimes bawdy duets of John Prine and Iris Dement and the back and forth conversational style of Johnny and June Carter Cash.    Means and Timmons took on the name Sally & George as a tribute to Means’ dapper grandparents. In 2014 Means’ grandfather George passed away, leaving an entire ranch house full of vintage clothes, furniture, dishes, and cobwebs for Means’ mother to clean out. Knowing her daughter’s love of vintage clothes Sherri Means saved Sally and George’s hip threads and gifted them to Means and Timmons on Thanksgiving in 2014. This was also the time Means and Timmons began recording   Tip my heart,   They arrived at the initial sessions at Thunderground Sound Studio wearing Sally & George’s clothes.    After the holiday and back in Nashville, the duo struggled to find a band name that would stick. One night after donning Sally & George’s outfits to go out in Nashville, Joel said, “We’re stepping out like Sally & George”. Shelby’s eyes lit up and she said, “That’s it! That’s our band name!” Sally & George felt like a natural fit, like slipping into an old pair of your grandpa’s jeans.    Prior to forming Sally & George, Means and Timmons spent time in Della Mae and Sol Driven Train, respectively. Means was nominated for a GRAMMY for Della Mae’s   this world oft can be,   and the band won IBMA’s Emerging Artist of the Year. They performed at Bonnaroo, Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, Merlefest, Pickathon and twice at the Grand Ole Opry and were U.S. cultural ambassadors, performing in 20 countries around the world including Brazil, Saudi Arabia, U.A.E., Pakistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Friends since childhood, the members of Sol Driven Train toured the U.S. for a decade, building a dedicated grassroots following. They independently released 10 albums, including two albums for children.

In the town where country music was born--where two states come together on one street--a spark lit and a duo was ignited. At the 2012 Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion, on the way to take the stage with his band, Sol Driven Train, guitarist/singer Joel Timmons found himself sidetracked by Della Mae, an all-female, GRAMMY-nominated bluegrass band. It was that group's bass player, Shelby Means, who most captivated his attention. After a conversation at the merchandise table about their shared love of travel and music, two-years passed before Means and Timmons would reconnect. A bold love song led the way, and eventually a growing romance turned into the Nashville-based duo Sally & George and their debut album tip my heart.

With tip my heart, Sally & George have made an engaging, eclectic debut album. It’s a thoughtful meditation on Means’ and Timmons’ courtship and love (the duo got engaged in July 2016 on a mountain in North Carolina after work on tip my heart was completed). The album deftly moves from rollicking, electrified rockers to stripped down, gauzy reflections on love and faith, to walking bass-led country-indebted duets. All of it is done tastefully, with an earnestness that does not shy away from humor or the occasional cuss word.

tip my heart came together over the course of two-years, in three chapters. The first chapter began in Laramie, Wyoming at Thanksgiving 2014. Timmons and Means were visiting Means’ parents for the holiday. They had four original songs and since the snow was coming down sideways, they enlisted the engineering of a mutual friend and decided to go into the studio. Their intention was to have some fun and experiment recording together. After a day and a half in Thunderground Sound Studio, the duo had five rough mixes and newfound confidence that they could make a great record together. When they were driving to Denver to catch their flight home, they were so excited listening to their roughs that they missed a turn and ended up in Nebraska.

Chapter two was over a year later in Charleston, SC, at the home studio of Shovels & Rope on Wadmalaw Island. After a busy year, Means and Timmons had gathered enough songs to go back into the studio. Shovels & Rope’s Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent were old friends of Timmons’ in the Charleston music scene. Since Hearst and Trent were taking some time off the road with their new baby, they invited Sally & George to spend a few days recording at Studio Bees. The family atmosphere and the rock and roll edge of Shovels & Rope both found their way into the music that was recorded there.

Chapter three happened six months later. Sally & George finished things off at Tim Carter’s studio just outside of Music City. The casual atmosphere at Tim’s cabin studio made Sally & George feel at home and they were able to dig into the final production of tip my heart, they brought in Nashville friends like 10 String Symphony, Langhorne Slim, The Danberrys and more for overdubs and finished the record.

The title track, "Tip My Heart," is a great example of what makes Sally & George such a potent musical duo. Written by Means when she was still in Della Mae, the song didn't fit into that band's framework. The playful lyrics (with references to Jack and Jill and Humpty Dumpty) are enhanced by Shelby and Joel's glittering harmonies and a fiery electric guitar.

After their initial meeting at Bristol Rhythm and Roots, Timmons was inspired to write “Pipedream,” vividly imagining what it would be like to spend the rest of their lives together. He emailed Means the song and waited an excruciating two weeks for her reply. She finally wrote back, thanking him for the flattery and commenting that it took big balls to send something like that. She also informed him that she already had a boyfriend. When that boyfriend exited the picture a few months later, their romance began.

“Wild Tiger Style” and “Love Electric” both reflect the duos rock and roll side, with electric guitars and seductive, impassioned vocals. A gauzy, questioning track, “Baby” was inspired by a quote Means heard in yoga class and her time spent rocking a newborn baby to sleep at a plant nursery job. The track came together at Shovels & Rope’s studio, with Trent and Hearst’s baby blessing the space before tapes were rolling.

A longtime surfer in Charleston, Timmons’ love for Means meant uprooting himself and moving to Nashville. “Nashville Beach” is Timmons’ attempt to assuage his ocean heart by imagining life in Nashville as a different kind of wave. “Hey Wow” was Sally & George’s first appointment co-write. The duo scheduled a time and met in their living room, channeling the sometimes bawdy duets of John Prine and Iris Dement and the back and forth conversational style of Johnny and June Carter Cash.

Means and Timmons took on the name Sally & George as a tribute to Means’ dapper grandparents. In 2014 Means’ grandfather George passed away, leaving an entire ranch house full of vintage clothes, furniture, dishes, and cobwebs for Means’ mother to clean out. Knowing her daughter’s love of vintage clothes Sherri Means saved Sally and George’s hip threads and gifted them to Means and Timmons on Thanksgiving in 2014. This was also the time Means and Timmons began recording Tip my heart, They arrived at the initial sessions at Thunderground Sound Studio wearing Sally & George’s clothes.

After the holiday and back in Nashville, the duo struggled to find a band name that would stick. One night after donning Sally & George’s outfits to go out in Nashville, Joel said, “We’re stepping out like Sally & George”. Shelby’s eyes lit up and she said, “That’s it! That’s our band name!” Sally & George felt like a natural fit, like slipping into an old pair of your grandpa’s jeans.

Prior to forming Sally & George, Means and Timmons spent time in Della Mae and Sol Driven Train, respectively. Means was nominated for a GRAMMY for Della Mae’s this world oft can be, and the band won IBMA’s Emerging Artist of the Year. They performed at Bonnaroo, Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, Merlefest, Pickathon and twice at the Grand Ole Opry and were U.S. cultural ambassadors, performing in 20 countries around the world including Brazil, Saudi Arabia, U.A.E., Pakistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Friends since childhood, the members of Sol Driven Train toured the U.S. for a decade, building a dedicated grassroots following. They independently released 10 albums, including two albums for children.

THE REGGIE SULLIVAN BAND ~ FacebookWebsiteMusic

Since forming in early 2012, The Reggie Sullivan Band has become one of the hottest bands in South Carolina. Their reputation as a wildly entertaining live act grew after the release of their CD Together in June of 2012. The band also released their second CD Nobody’s Home in October of 2013. They work hard on building their fan base by playing shows throughout the Southeast and always offer top-notch musicianship and fresh twists on their arrangements. The band is building its reputation on a strong work ethic and has been a top draw at local festivals such as Viva La Vista, Oyster Festival, Rhythm on The River, been featured on radio stations such as WXRY and 92.1 The Palm, and has won competitions such as Building The Band at The Tin Roof. With Reggie Sullivan on bass and vocals, Evans Mcgill on guitar, and Geoff Shackley on drums the band is a winning combination.

Since forming in early 2012, The Reggie Sullivan Band has become one of the hottest bands in South Carolina. Their reputation as a wildly entertaining live act grew after the release of their CD Together in June of 2012. The band also released their second CD Nobody’s Home in October of 2013. They work hard on building their fan base by playing shows throughout the Southeast and always offer top-notch musicianship and fresh twists on their arrangements. The band is building its reputation on a strong work ethic and has been a top draw at local festivals such as Viva La Vista, Oyster Festival, Rhythm on The River, been featured on radio stations such as WXRY and 92.1 The Palm, and has won competitions such as Building The Band at The Tin Roof. With Reggie Sullivan on bass and vocals, Evans Mcgill on guitar, and Geoff Shackley on drums the band is a winning combination.

SHAKE IT LIKE A CAVEMAN ~ FacebookWebsiteMusic

Shake it like a caveman is no stranger to the highway. He’s a one man band dance party, thrusting somewhere between poolside film scores and early American work songs. Sonic and Visual dynamite that makes you move that thang.  “Rock Et Sauvage” Elle Magazine Paris, France  “A Sexy Trance Inducing Experience” The North Coast Journal Humbolt County, California  “Electric neo-blues & amped-up disco porn grooves” The Philadelphia Examiner  “Shake it like a Caveman makes music that rocks like only a 10-piece outfit can. The thing is, Shake It Like A Caveman is a one-man-band”. KUT- Radio Austin, Texas  “Exuberant and gritty garage-stomp. Instantly, this music spoke to me”…. Nashville Scene  “Shake it like a caveman’s electric convulsive twist provide a hearty tonic for lingering spiritual deficits.” Indy Week, Chapel Hill, North Carolina  “Authentic broken down no messing proper sounding old school blues that is good for your soul.” Organ- London, England

Shake it like a caveman is no stranger to the highway. He’s a one man band dance party, thrusting somewhere between poolside film scores and early American work songs. Sonic and Visual dynamite that makes you move that thang.

“Rock Et Sauvage” Elle Magazine Paris, France

“A Sexy Trance Inducing Experience” The North Coast Journal Humbolt County, California

“Electric neo-blues & amped-up disco porn grooves” The Philadelphia Examiner

“Shake it like a Caveman makes music that rocks like only a 10-piece outfit can. The thing is, Shake It Like A Caveman is a one-man-band”. KUT- Radio Austin, Texas

“Exuberant and gritty garage-stomp. Instantly, this music spoke to me”…. Nashville Scene

“Shake it like a caveman’s electric convulsive twist provide a hearty tonic for lingering spiritual deficits.” Indy Week, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

“Authentic broken down no messing proper sounding old school blues that is good for your soul.” Organ- London, England

BIG LIKE THE OCEAN - Facebook | Music

Music is our Soup Kitchen. Bring a bowl and come hungry!

SUNFLOWERS & SIN ~ Facebook | Music

We grew up on the outskirts of the little town of Greeneville, Tennessee. Country and bluegrass oozes from the foothills of these mountains, and has become a huge influence for us. In high school, we became active in chorus and discovered the intricacies of harmonies and the basic music theory behind the songs we loved. Although college separated us geographically, we always managed to gather around a fire or a kitchen table during breaks and holidays with a good bottle of Tennessee whiskey to play new and old tunes we'd been working on. We moved to Charleston on a whim in hopes of spending more time with each other, our music, and of course, the ocean! Sunflowers and Sin is our first step into the expanding world of live music, and we'd love you to join us as we find our voices in the Charleston music scene!

We grew up on the outskirts of the little town of Greeneville, Tennessee. Country and bluegrass oozes from the foothills of these mountains, and has become a huge influence for us. In high school, we became active in chorus and discovered the intricacies of harmonies and the basic music theory behind the songs we loved. Although college separated us geographically, we always managed to gather around a fire or a kitchen table during breaks and holidays with a good bottle of Tennessee whiskey to play new and old tunes we'd been working on. We moved to Charleston on a whim in hopes of spending more time with each other, our music, and of course, the ocean! Sunflowers and Sin is our first step into the expanding world of live music, and we'd love you to join us as we find our voices in the Charleston music scene!

 

The Location

USA Raft

1-800-USA-RAFT
http://www.usaraft.com/
2 Jones Branch Rd
Erwin, TN, 37650

 

Saturday 8/31/19 | 10am to 3pm
Nolichucky Gorge
- Lunch Trip
- Ages 10+ - Class 4 Adventure!
- $80.00 a person

Saturday 8/31/19 | 11am to 3pm
Lower Nolichucky Half Day Trip
- Lunch Trip
- Ages 4+ - Class 1-3 Family Float Adventure
- $45.00 a person

Call to get the special rates!

USA Raft ~ Website | Facebook

USA Raft offers French Broad River rafting and Nolichucky River rafting as well as caving, guided fishing, SUP and river tubing from an outfitter you know and trust. Having offered the best in white water rafting for over 30 years we have been adding more unique guided trips to better serve our guests. Stay in one of our unique lodges and sample our vast menu of adventure options.  Our professional guides focus on providing a safe, first class adventure.  In fact if we can’t be the best at the adventures we are guiding we simply won’t do it!  Our French Broad rafting outpost is just 30 minutes from Asheville and the Nolichucky is 50 minute drive from Asheville.

 

A Good Cause

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Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy ~ Website | Facebook

A portion of the proceeds will go towards benefiting the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy. SAHC works to conserve the unique plant and animal habitat, clean water, farmland, scenic beauty, and places for people to enjoy outdoor recreation in the mountains of North Carolina and Tennessee for the benefit of present and future generations. We achieve this by forging and maintaining long-term conservation relationships with private landowners and public agencies, owning and managing land and encouraging healthy local communities.

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Ziggy's Second Chance Network ~ Facebook

Ziggy's Second Chance Network is a small group of volunteers dedicated to providing care to special needs and senior animals... and spaying all the cats!

 

The Details

Camping:

Camping will be festival style! We have a lovely site on the banks of the Nolichucky river, but space is limited and we want as many happy campers as possible to attend the Sol Slam Mountain Jam! Tent spaces will be close together. Please count on only having room for a tent, small table, and chairs so that more people can camp! You may bring a canopy but please conserve space! There are lots of trees for hammock camping.

  • Check in for camping is Friday at 12 Noon

  • Check out is Monday at 11am.

  • Practice Leave No Trace Principles! Pack in, Pack out! Bring extra trash bags, don’t litter, clean up after yourself and be a good neighbor. Please do not leave items at the campground when you leave.

  • Practice Kindness and meet your new festy fam! It makes the festival more enjoyable for all!

  • If there is an emergency, or you really need to make a phone call there is a land line in the lodge and the USA Raft Store.

Fires:

  • Campfires are permitted in established fire rings throughout the property. Please do not build additional fire rings.

  • Outside Firewood is prohibited due to the increase in invasive species transfer.

  • We will have firewood for sale in our store.

Tickets:

  • We will not be mailing or emailing tickets.

  • Arrival and check in will be at will call in the USA Raft Store. Please check in at the store for directions to your campsite and instructions for shuttle and offsite parking. Bring a photo ID.

Pets:

  • Dogs on a leash are welcome at Sol Slam! We love Fido!!!

  • Please be considerate of your neighbors and don’t leave Fido alone if he/she likes to bark.

  • Please scoop the poop! Plan to bring bags, but they will be available on site as well.

  • We will keep our resident USA Raft/Mountain River Guides dogs on leash or inside.

Parking and shuttles:

  • On Site Parking Passes are $25. If you do not purchase a parking pass there will be an off site parking lot with complimentary shuttles.

  • Off site parking a few miles away will be the standard unless special circumstances have been prearranged. For example: You have a sleeping setup in your vehicle.

  • You will have 30 minutes to unload your vehicle onsite when you arrive on Friday. If you cannot pull directly up to your campsite we will have people onsite available to assist.

  • We will provide shuttles to and from off-site parking throughout the day until a hour after the last show.

Store:

  • We have a store onsite that will sell general snack items, bug spray, sunscreen, t-shirts, stickers, firewood, ice, supplies etc..but we encourage you to bring all supplies with you as we do not have a large selection of camping goods.

Vendors:

  • There will be lots of food and merchandise vendors onsite. We will put a list on Facebook soon..

Food and Drink:

  • We will have several food vendors to choose from during the festival as well as our camp store that sells snacks and drinks.

  • Lodging guests are welcome to use our communal kitchen in the Lodge or the charcoal grills on site.

  • Bring coolers for your food and beverages! We sell ice in the store.

  • There will be alcoholic beverages for sale on site, but you are welcome to bring your own.

  • NO GLASS BOTTLES as they can break and become a safety hazard!

  • Please remember to stock up on food and drink before you arrive as most parking will be offsite. There are 2 grocery stores in Erwin. There are also pizza places that deliver to our office.

Trash and Recycling:

  • Practice Leave No Trace Principles!

  • Please help keep our campground clean by picking up all trash.

  • Trash and recycling receptacles will be provided throughout the property.

  • Cigarette butts are NOT biodegradable and will be picked up one by one after the festival so please be considerate.

Cell Phones:

  • We will not have dedicated phone charging areas but campers may use electric outlets in the Lodge to charge cell phones.

  • Signal is extremely limited. AT&T, Consumer Cellular, and Verizon may be able to send/receive text messages. Do not count on phone calls to meet your friends!

  • If there is an emergency, or you really need to make a phone call there is a land line in the lodge and the USA Raft Store.

Lost and Found:

  • The lost and found is located in the store at the USA Raft outpost.

What to bring:

  • In packing for your stay at SSMJ, bring rain gear, warm clothes, and an extra pair of shoes or sneakers in case it rains.

  • We also recommend bug spray, a blanket for seating, sunscreen, hat for shade, a container (or two!) for water, plastic bags for trash, extra toilet paper (just in case), a lantern or a flashlight with extra batteries, a camera, and a smile!

What not to bring:

  • No weapons of any kind

  • No fireworks

  • No illegal substances

  • No unauthorized vending